When a woman loves a man

Posted by júl 01 2010

It’s hard to believe, but David Fincher, the man behind brilliant thrillers like “Seven,” “Fight Club”, and “Alien 3″ is now the director of the most exciting romantic drama of our age. The genius master decided to spice up his cinematic resume with a surrealistic love story. Through the reversed life of his hero he is throwing us into a deep-deep pool of tears, and it’s up to us, if we sink down into the swamp of sorrow, float on the waves of laughter or cleanse ourselves with the painful and warm tears of love…

Travel with Benjamin…

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is curious indeed: the story starts in 1920’s after the World War as a little baby boy is born into the body of a nearly hundred year old Metushelah. His mother died while she was giving birth, and as his father, after seeing the baby with his all-wrinkled skin, decides to get rid of his own flesh and blood as soon as possible. After finding his new home with a family who knows exactly how is it to be different from all the others, we discover the secret: the strange little old boy is actually growing younger and younger as the years go by. The Forrest Gump-like storyline gives us the impression that we are all relatives, friends and mentors in this adventouros life. And although we feel we are a part of his path, we can never be as close to him as a little girl… woman… old lady, who has to go climb all the stairs of heavens and hell if she doesn’t want to give up on her loved one.

Anyone who saw the fantastic movie, “Babel” knows exactly how the chemistry works between Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett. Not just because she is pretty, tall and has an appearance of a queen, and he is charming and handsome as he has ever been, but also because both of them are shining with the glow of the classic Hollywood stars, and never seem superficial for a single second. Through three and a half-hour long movie, the actors and the creators are spoiling us with so many colors that the film never seems boring or heavy. Of course it helps a lot, that the movie is flawless also from a virtual point of view. The excellent work of the visual artists, designers and the entire crew is deserving every single technical Oscar which the film was nominated for. It also worth every minute what the make-up artists spent with applying the mask on Pitt, for turning him into Benjamin Button… it took five whole hours every single day.

The screenwriter Eric Roth based his story on a novel by Scott Fitzgerald, and even if the title is the same, the dramaturgy is as different as it can be. In the original story a sage was born old, with knowledge and wisdom, and later on he dies having forgotten everything, without even understanding how does it happen – he is just getting lost in the dark. Roth decided to introduce his own Benjamin as old man only in appearance, but with the mind of a newborn baby. This small twist entirely changes the character of the hero: it seems like Benjamin has nothing to loose and he is becoming younger, more handsome, and also wiser. But towards the end of the story, Roth decides to change his tune again, and now the little hero is suddenly loosing everything: his wisdom, his intelligence and most importantly his capability for being in love.

The plot ends in our days, as the Katrina hurricane destroys New-Orleans. The dramatic ending is not only spectacular but it works as an amazing metaphor: we usually deal with the acceptance of death in our own silent and personal way, trying to think about it as a natural part of life. But to loose our loved ones while we are still alive, can cause a real storm inside. A storm which in the end can be more devestating than the death itself…

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